How to Travel the World while Earning a Living

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How to Travel the World while Earning a Living

People today are searching for a more flexible way of living. A way to keep their job and enjoy the luxury of traveling at the same time. Well ask no more. We’re going to take a look on how it’s possible and the top careers which will give you the freedom to travel.

The perception that traveling is expensive keeps many people from embarking on a journey around the world. They think to themselves “it’s too expensive” “too difficult” and “I’ll never be able to do it.” But honestly, traveling is not as expensive as it first appears. Yes that’s right! Even if you can’t save thousands of pounds, you can always find work overseas.

Finding work overseas is not like finding a job in the United Kingdom. It’s a much more informal. If you remember you are looking for a job rather than a career, and stay flexible with your options, you’ll be able to find work anywhere. Whole economies and industries are built around employing travelers. Heck, I don’t think the Australian economy would survive without backpackers!

So what kind of job do people do overseas? Here are some top jobs that often get the best results:

1) Under 30? Get a working holiday visa!

If you are under the age of 30, the world is your oyster (so to speak)! Australia, New Zealand, Canada, England, Norway, and many other countries offer working holiday visas to those under the age of 30. A working holiday visa allows you to take any job in the country. Most of the time, these are easy temporary and seasonal jobs. It’s essentially a work permit and it’s awesome. (Note: every country has their own rules and some place limits on what you can and can’t do.)

To find these jobs, search local job boards or walk into any hostel and ask around. In countries where working holiday visas are really prevalent (Australia, I’m looking at you!), many hostels have job boards or can point you in the right direction.

2) Do freelance work online

freelanceIf you have a background in web services, design, programming, or anything tech, a website like Upwork is a great way to find virtual work that you can complete as you travel. Just pick up work as you need it. There’s a lot of competition but if you build up your portfolio, you can get a lot of work over time. I have a friend who gets all her freelance consulting jobs from Upwork!

If you don’t have tech skills, you can still start a profile and find clients for a variety of research-based jobs. Task Rabbit and Fiverr are two other sites for finding online work to get you by.

3) Use your super skills!

img_6117-1

Use your existing skills and talents to find work. Teach people music, dance, cut hair, offer business consulting, cook for people – use whatever skill you have to find a job. Don’t be shy. Be creative. Websites like Behance, Freelancer, and Gumtree are one of the places to advertise your abilities and find work. If there is a will, there is a way.

4) Get seasonal work

Move with the seasons and work in ski resorts, bars, as a camping guide, on boats, whatever. There are many options—wherever there’s a big tourist season, you’ll find a big demand for temporary labor. Make sure you get to your destination well before the season starts to secure a job. If you show up mid-season, all the good jobs will be taken. Show up to hostels and ask around and they will be able to point you in the right direction!

5) Work on a Yacht

travelingIf you love the water, work on a boat (and forever be singing “I’m on a Boat” by Lonely Island). Yachting jobs are surprising easy to get without much experience (though it helps) and you’ll be able to sail around the world doing so. One of my friends does it so she could see the world. You can find jobs on the following website:

(Note: Positions are long-term and you’ll be required to get a STCW ’95 certificate, which covers all basic yacht training, including fire and water safety training.)

6) Work in a hostel

Speaking of hostels, hostels are often looking for staff to work the desk, clean, or show the guests around town. You can often trade a few hours of cleaning for a free bed. Even if you aren’t getting paid but just getting free room and board, it’s still a way to save money. When you aren’t spending, you’re saving. Moreover, they jobs can often be for as long as you want – a day, week, month. Whatever you want and they need.

7) Become an instructor

travling - scuba divingIf you are a certified diver and want to become an instructor (additional classes my be needed), there are dozens of great scuba destinations around the world where you can easily find work (Thailand, Cambodia, Honduras, the Caribbean, and Bali are all good destinations). You can find jobs just by going to these destinations and asking around.

8) Teach English (or any language!)

This is the easiest type of job to get for native English speakers. Teaching jobs are incredibly abundant around the world, especially in Southeast Asia. Really, when in doubt, find a teaching job. They pay well, the hours are flexible, and many countries offer great bonuses.  Not only will you have a fantastic time being an ex-pat,  you also learned a lot about yourself, living overseas, and can make enough money to keep you on the road for years. There are a lot of online resources for potential teachers

9) Work in a restaurant

working abroad

On that same vein, waitstaff, bus boys, and dishwashers are always in demand since people come and go from those jobs very frequently. These jobs are easy to get, especially in popular backpacking and party destinations as well as large cities. Again, in countries that have working holiday visas, travelers become the backbone of the service economy and jobs can often be easy to get.

10) Be a tour guide

source: pkr

source: pkrUse your love of travel to work in travel! Tour companies are always on the lookout for new tour guides. This is more of a “real” job than the rest, but it’s a fun (though tiring) means of employment. The pay isn’t great but you get your expenses paid while on the tour and get to meet people from all over the world. Some of the platforms you may use to earn while you travel are ShowaroundBusabout, Kiwi Experience, New Europe Walking Tours, and Contiki (Note: some of these jobs often require a long-term commitment.) 

11) Do volunteer work

source: work in India

source: work in India

While these jobs don’t pay, you’ll save money on room and board, which will save you money and keep you on the road longer. Plus, you’ll be doing something good. Win-win. You don’t have to spend a lot of money with large global operations in order to volunteer. Those companies just end up keeping a large cut for themselves for “operations.” Instead, find volunteer work when you arrive at a destination to find more opportunities where your time (and money) help the most. I also recommend the website Grassroots Volunteering. It’s the best site for finding small scale, local volunteer initiatives.

12) Take whatever you can find

selling aboradYou can always trade your labor for work. There are a lot of short-term jobs around the world you can find. Jobs that you can get on the fly. If you’re willing to work a few hours each day in exchange for room, board, and extra cash, you will always find something you can do. Four great resources for finding jobs are:

Finding work overseas is all about finding a job, not a career. Many of the jobs you’ll find overseas will be hard work, but they will allow you to earn enough money to keep you on the road longer.

Don’t let money get in the way of travel. If you are creative and flexible about what you want to do, you will find work. Working on the road was a lot easier than I thought and it let me travel a lot longer than I could ever imagine. Get out there, find a job, and explore the world a bit longer while you still can.

Lovetheidea
Lovetheidea

We're a team of happy and creative people with a passion for building new and exciting ideas. We love what we do and always looking for our next challenge big or small.

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